Tiesto Toasts U2 With Pride Remix

Once upon a time, we went clubbing. Before raves, before house music, we went clubbing and danced to new wave “club mixes,” released as 12-inch singles. We would spend more 1980s cash on these vinyl delicacies than we would ever shell out today for an iTunes download.

In the mid-1980s, I shook my rear without fear to my favorite band’s songs re-framed as dance hits. My favorite, the original Steve Lillywhite remix of “Two Hearts Beat As One” is still available on the bonus disc of the War re-issue.

Electronic dance music has come a long way since the 1980s, but thanks to the renowned curator of sound known as Tiesto, the U2 dance mix can get my middle-aged-behind to boogie. Thanks to the interwebs, I can get my dance on in the morning, in comfort of my crib all alone.

Released in honor of World AIDS Day 2012 and the Dance (RED) campaign, this Tiesto-spiced version of “Pride” includes a soulful crisp new vocal track and the lyrical correction about the time of day in Memphis that Martin King took the bullet. The song about social justice and self-sacrificial nonviolent love feels as relevant in this new version as it did in 1984. In the name of love indeed! -Andrew William Smith, Editor

Check out the track here:

https://soundcloud.com/u2news/dance-red-save-lives-u2-vs-ti

U22: A Defining Disc from U2.Com Fan Club

  Almost a year has passed since U2 wrapped up its landmark 360° Tour at Moncton, Canada’s Magnetic Hill Festival. The Irish band’s tour encompassed three years, a landmark stage setup, and an audience of over seven million people while en route to becoming the highest-grossing tour of all time. The scope of the tour, one of several industry-defining tours in the band’s storied career, is as big as any in recent memory. To capture this period of U2’s career, the band recently issued U22, a fan-voted fan club-only release which manages to encapsulate the 360° Tour as the group’s best live album since U2 go Home: Live From Slane Castle in 2003.
    For a tour as vast as the 360° Tour, U22 captures the enormity of several different shows while injecting the double-disc with several special moments. The most important being the band’s magical cut of “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” with South African trumpeter Hugh Maskela. The spot-on mix of U22is also a big element in the quality of the set. While some live releases turn down the crowd mic, the mix on U22kept the audience on par with the band, allowing the big stadium choruses to become even more epic. The drum and bass mix are also of an unusual high quality for a live release.
    Among the best selections from U22 are an energy-infused take of “Even Better Than The Real Thing” and a version of “Until The End of the World” that is interspersed with a snippet of Frank Sinatra’s “Strangers In The Night.” Other highlights include a blistering solo from The Edge on “Elevation,” How To Dismantle An Atomic Bomb’s “City of Blinding Lights,” and an unbelievable performance of the extended version of “Bad.” Not to be left out is “With or Without You,” where the London crowd almost manages to drown out Bono on each chorus.
     Perhaps it was the fan voting, but U22 managed to separate the newer material from No Line On The Horizon and also allowed some of the best and most interesting songs to make it on the list instead of a regurgitated best hits. A great snapshot of not a single concert, but rather of an era, U22 defines the group in one of their peak eras in the same way that Rattle and Hum and Under a Blood Red Sky captured the group at their best. –John Saeger
To learn more about this special release, go to U2.com!This piece originally appeared on the website Long After Dark. We thank John Saeger for sharing it with us. 
http://www.longafterdark.net/2012/07/u2-captures-360-tour-with-u22-album.htmlWhat do you think about U22? Leave a comment or send your own review to andy@interference.com

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It’s All We Can Do

Editing the webzine of a U2 fansite can be challenging. In general, we’re looking for really thoughtful essays that strive to say what hasn’t already been said, even when retracing steps we’ve taken before. Even though some material has been addressed previously in other contexts, it’s still possible to shed new light, as is the case with an excellent, thoughtful piece we wish we’d written; here, Paul De Revere looks back for consequenceofsound.net with a wide lens at Bono’s lifelong intersection of the personal and political, spiritual and social, rooted in the uplifting “gnostic gospel” of The Joshua Tree in general and “Where The Streets Have No Name” in particular. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did. -the editors

http://consequenceofsound.net/2012/03/its-all-we-can-do-standing-at-the-cross-streets-of-political-and-personal/

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Bono Envy And The Box Office

Editor’s Note: In addition to making its rounds on DVD, online, and on pay-per-view TV, the new film Killing Bono, based in part on the writing of Neil McCormick, is enjoying a limited US theatrical release. You can check your local listings for more details.

Don’t talk about Rattle and Hum. Don’t talk about your Spidey sense and SciFi musicals. The history of our Bono and clear success at movie or theatre box offices are a mixed bag.

Unrivaled at selling out rock concerts? Yes. Concert DVDs doing well in the 2000s? Yes. But this doesn’t mean that a movie that frames you as a minor character will be a big hit.

Killing Bono bases itself on the frustrated truth of growing up in the shadow of giants. From a plot made with a jolt of rockstar-caliber jealousy, Killing Bono tries to be many things to different people, but a typically nerdy rock biopic for the hardcore U2 fans it’s not. Even though the work of Neil McCormick as journalist and tweeter are well-loved among U2 fans, many of us are not sure what to make of Killing Bono.

The early parts of the flick feature all the members of U2 as characters, with some choice footage from their roots at school, complete with (formerly known as) The Hype’s first gig and a hilarious scene when when Paul and Dave adopt their stage names at the same time they drop “The Hype” for the hype-yet-to -come in U2. But does this film work as an Irish Almost Famous? Is this movie a faithful rendering of McCormick’s prose?

The American drop of Killing Bono coincides with the epic onslaught of Achtung Baby rerelease options. Was this intentional? Surely, this saturated market manages to appease the post-360-tour blues among fans willing to pay to stay engaged with their favorite band.

But pit the mixed-up comedy mostly-about-the-band’s-mates against the garden harvest of DVDs and documentaries, and most U2 fans are going to be perfectly pleased to dig deeper into their new Uber and Super box sets and may end up ignoring Killing Bono. Maybe we prefer Bono admiration to Bono envy.  –Andrew William Smith, Editor
 

360 Full Circle: U2 Ends Tour In Moncton

Not to start on a down note, but it is hard not to write an obituary. For many of us fans, U2’s 360 Tour stage, “The Claw,” has become an entity of its own. With the tour ending in Moncton, and the eventual fate of the Claws currently unknown, it is a little sad to think of the giant steel structure being disassembled for the last time. For more than two years, this engineering marvel has thrilled audiences around the world. Its arrival and assembly in town meant something cool and different was about to happen. It enhanced U2’s show without overshadowing them. It had a personality (if possibly only a projection of U2’s Willie Williams’ own personality) and some faults (legs that blocked some people’s views and a screen that increasingly lost some pixels). Such a presence will be missed, even if we know as fans that the band will return someday.

The end of a tour is both exciting and melancholy. U2 is able to relax and be a little more playful knowing that the demands of the tour will be over soon, but there also is an air of sadness with the eventuality of this production’s magic coming to an end.

Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada hosted this ending, and it did so well. With nearly 100,000 people in attendance, concerns about logistics in this smaller town were valid, and there were some glitches. Yes, traffic was somewhat difficult, but only those with unrealistic expectations could have been disappointed or annoyed. Moncton and its people embraced this event and should be proud of their efforts.

Carney kicked off the night with an ambitious performance. For me, too many cover songs marred what seems to be a relatively talented band.

The Arcade Fire took the stage for a performance that I had been anticipating for months. They played a fairly standard set, which is great for their long-time fans, but not immediately engaging for such a large crowd. The band has plenty of loud, catchy tunes to draw-in the audience, however it took almost 10 songs into their 12-song set for fans to be interested outside of the immediate Claw stage area. I had hoped that they might join U2 on stage at some point later that night like they had in Montreal on the Vertigo Tour. Unfortunately, as an Arcade Fire fan, they did not. Fortunately, as a U2 fan, it did not matter because Bono, Edge, Adam and Larry gave such a great performance without any special guests.

Many “ending” songs played over the stage’s speaker system before the band came out: The Rolling Stones The Last Time, REM’s It’s The End of The World As We Know It, etc. Also, two F-18 fighter jets made a few flyovers of the concert grounds before the show started. This may have thrilled the crowd more than either warm-up band.

Jet Flyover video link

Finally, U2 took the stage to the repeating opening riff of Even Better Than The Real Thing. As had been the case with previous shows, several Achtung Baby songs opened, then I Will Follow and Get On Your Boots. Bono continued the refrain, “Get on your boots, Moncton. Moncton… Moncton as opposed to Muck-Town. That’s not good.” –a reference to the incredibly muddy condition of the field. Most attendees were well-prepared for a wet evening since it had rained the entire day. Thankfully, the sky cleared up, and mud was the only annoyance to be endured. Bono referenced the rain as well saying, “Deep down, I know you like your rock stars wet.” I only can imagine that he was responding to any number of the signs that the die-hard fans were holding up in the Claw’s pit.

The Fly video link

After crowd sing-along favorite I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For, Bono performed a verse from Springhill Mining Disaster. A great cheer rose up as locals appreciated the small recognition from the band of the disaster that happened in nearby Nova Scotia.

Springhill Mining Disaster video link

Little flourishes throughout the night were reminders that this was a special show. Larry performed an extended drum solo at the end of Elevation. During the Crazy Tonight Remix, members of the 360 Tour crew replaced the usual faces of Bono, Edge, Adam and Larry on the video screen. Some of them mugged the way the guys usually do. Others smiled. Some looked embarrassed.

 

 

Much to the crowd’s delight, Bono belted out a beautiful and sorrowful verse of Hallelujah before the chiming guitar opening of Where The Streets Have No Name began. Streets always is a hit, but to see a mass of people in the General Admission section that flowed seemingly endlessly uphill from the stage clapping along was amazing.

Beautiful Day video link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The encore brought the usual trio of songs in addition to Bono’s multitude of “thank-yous” before Moment Of Surrender. As they played a particularly raucous version of Out Of Control, Bono, obviously enjoying the atmosphere, said during the middle section, “I’m not going anywhere without a bottle of champagne, so take as long as you want.” When he received the bottle, he opened it and began to spray the people in the pit. After a little discussion, Adam and Edge switched sides of the stage signifying they were going to play the traditional U2 show ending song, 40. While finishing his part, Bono removed his glasses and revealed his eyes welling up with tears.

It was a beautiful and emotional night. So many people in Moncton were seeing U2 and the 360 Tour for the first time, but as for myself and many others, we were seeing it for the last time. My U2 360 Tour spanned 12 shows in 9 cities in the U.S. and Canada, including the North American opener in Chicago and now the tour closer in Moncton.

Over the course of the tour, I have gotten to experience so many great things: meeting up with old friends, meeting new friends, visiting new cities, hearing new songs, hearing old songs redone, hearing songs I never thought I would get to hear live… just so many great things. It has been a wonderful ride. I would like to say a “hello” and a “take care” to all of my U2 AOL MB friends (you know who you are), my Interference friends (those I have met in person and those I have only met online) and to some of the random people I was fortunate to run into along the way: Chris and Stephanie, Alan, JJ and Katja, Audrie, Michel, Paul and others. I hope to see you again someday. I am so glad that we all took the time to introduce ourselves to the people around us. I am so glad we all met while seeing U2.

Bono added a long extra verse to the end of Stay (Faraway, So Close) Saturday night, and I think it is appropriate to close out the reviews of the 360 Tour:

“3 o’clock in the morning,

and the trucks roll out of town.

Ray Daniels, we’ll be thinking of you,

sittin’ on his cloud.

110 shows,

but strangely, this feels like home.

Glad my wife is here tonight.

It’s not a night to be alone.

Everbody’s lover,

everbody’s brother,

all came here for the show.

Some loves, some loves

are just so hard to let go.

3 o’clock in the morning.

It’s quiet. There’s no one around.

Just the bang and the clatter

As 360 leaves town.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 July 2011

Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

Magnetic Hill Festival Grounds

Setlist

1. Even Better Than The Real Thing

2. The Fly

3. Mysterious Ways

4. Until The End Of The World

5. I Will Follow

6. Get On Your Boots

7. I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For

(Springhill Mining Disaster snippet)

8. Stay (Faraway, So Close)

9. Beautiful Day

10. Elevation

11. Pride (In The Name Of Love)

12. Miss Sarajevo

13. Zooropa

14. City Of Blinding Lights

15. Vertigo

16. Crazy Tonight Remix

17. Sunday Bloody Sunday

18. Scarlet

19. Walk On

20. One

21. Where The Streets Have No Name (Hallelujah Intro)

22. Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me

23. With Or Without You

24. Moment Of Surrender

25. Out Of Control

26. 40

 

Review, photos and video by kramwest1

:rockon:

U2 Stand By MN

The only thing that tempered my excitement for U2 bringing their 360 Tour to my hometown was my fear of what the weather might bring. Getting soaked during the concert was not my idea of fun, but it did not dampen most people’s enthusiasm during the show. However, in the spectrum of unpredictable Minnesota weather, heavy rain is much preferable to hail, high-winds and tornadoes (lightning seemed to be a non-issue, mercifully). At least with an outdoor concert scheduled in July in Minnesota, a blizzard does not enter into the forecast.

I think the only way I can adequately review my Minneapolis U2 weekend is to break it down into three parts: the Friday night Interference.com fan club get-together, the concert itself and the overall TCF Bank Stadium experience.

Interferencers (Blue Craicers, whatever) are rabid fans. We have been chomping at the bit for almost two years to have our fan meet-up in Minneapolis. It is always exciting to meet people that you have connected with online, but there often is a little apprehension, too. The “What if they don’t like me? What if I don’t like them? What if no one shows up?” thoughts run through my head. As has been my experience for this tour, those thoughts are useless. The other Minnesota fans are cool, nice people, and as a huge bonus, many fans from around the country (and a few from around the world) came to Minneapolis for the meet-up.

The Leaning Tower of Pizza on campus could not have been better hosts. Great, friendly servers keep us in drinks and food. It also helps to have a gathering in a university bar because no one blinks twice when there are spontaneous sing-a-longs to the U2 blaring from the jukebox. It was wonderful to see familiar faces again and a joy to meet so many new people, whether they were new to Interference or new to me in a non-internet setting.

Our plans for the concert as fans spanned a broad range; Some were going to get in the General Admission (GA) line almost immediately after the Friday night meeting, many of us were going to get in the GA line sometime during the afternoon, a few were lucky to have gotten Red Zone tickets, and a few others were headed for seats.

Walking in to the stadium, it was hard not to just stare at U2’s “Claw” stage even if I had seen it 10 times previously. It filled the field more than I had seen at any other show. After my initial awe, my eyes kept looking up to the skies, even though I had made peace with the possibility of rain. The hiking jacket and multiple Ziploc bags I had helped to mollify that fear.

 

There is far too much time between when the gates are opened and when U2 finally takes the stage, but it’s nice to use that time to wait for your other friends to arrive and to meet those strangers standing near you. As has been my experience for all of the shows I have been to this summer, the people around us ranged from U2 virgins to U2 veterans. It’s great to meet everyone, and it reminds me why I like to attend so many shows.

U2 took the stage and played four songs from Achtung Baby. Mysterious Ways barely had finished before the rain began. Edge had some guitar issues during Until The End Of The World, presumably from the wetness. The band and crew obviously knew that it would rain, so while adjustments were made on stage, the U2 continued seamlessly.

I was glad that after Get On Your Boots, Bono acknowledged that Minneapolis at one point was intended to be the final stop to the 360 Tour. This would have been fantastic, but I understand that financial and other considerations led to the final show being in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. Final shows often are epic and slightly longer than a normal show. I am ecstatic that I will get to attend that concert as well.

Even without being the final tour stop, it is obvious that the guys hold Minneapolis in high regard. The Vertigo Tour show at Target Center was one of the few tour stops that was honored with a rare second performance of Vertigo as the final encore. I was wondering how they might show their love for my city this time and was glad when Bono combined this affection with a special recognition of our state’s large immigrant population from the Horn of Africa. (Minnesota is home to the largest population of Somalis outside of Somalia, as well as many Ethiopians and Eritreans.) Toronto performer and Somali native, K’naan joined the band on stage for wonderful performance of Ben E. King’s Stand By Me.

As the rain fell harder, the band played on. I had heard during the 360 Tour shows last fall in Europe that the band, especially Bono and Adam, like to play in the rain and get even more enthusiastic. I didn’t necessarily believe that until Saturday night. Bono was having fun despite an occasional glitch from his drenched microphone. And Adam, much to the delight of some fans, finally stripped off his wet shirt. The bare-chested 51-year-old showed off his ripped chest and stomach as he smiled and marched around with his bass guitar.

Sunday Bloody Sunday by Tim Newell (in the pouring rain)

^video link

Snippets of songs about rain were peppered throughout the balance of U2’s performance; The highlight being a crooning of Purple Rain by Bono surrounding Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah which led into an amazing Where The Streets Have No Name.

During his introduction of the band, Bono alluded to the type of force of nature he heard from each band member during the previous show in New Jersey. Concluding the introductions with himself, Bono said, “Then I heard the voice of God. He said, ‘If you think you’re having fun now, wait ‘til you get to Minneapolis.’” That was funny on many levels. Bono is well-aware of his detractors who dislike his seemingly messianic traits, but he doesn’t care. And also, he is so charming and silver-tongued that I cannot help but half-smile and half-smirk as he so blatantly plays to his current crowd. Bono’s personality certainly is a large part of why the band has had such longevity and appeal. He, Edge, Adam and Larry drank in the cheers and applause before leaving the stage after the final song, Moment Of Surrender.

I am pleased that I got to experience a U2 “wet” performance at least once in my fan history. I wish it had been somewhere other than my home city, but there is no doubt that the soaked TCF Bank Stadium crowd loved the show.

The lines into the stadium were handled well; the lines for the buses after the show looked very long and slightly confusing. Overall, I think too many GA tickets were sold. The field was very crowded and finding your way through it was difficult. I am glad there was a plan in place in case of severe weather, but it was hard to believe that there would have been anything other than chaos on the field had there been an emergency. Since this was the inaugural concert at TCF Bank Stadium, some forgiveness can be offered for a little poor planning. Hopefully, for future shows, the stadium management will realize that they need access points to the field from both ends, that some portable toilets are needed on the field itself rather than requiring a long trek to the outside of the stadium and that fewer GA tickets should be sold. These are not minor complaints. The extreme crowding distracted from the show, but given how great U2’s performance was, ultimately I can overlook the flaws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

23 July 2011, TCF Bank Stadium

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Setlist

1. Even Better Than The Real Thing

2. The Fly

3. Mysterious Ways

4. Until The End Of The World

5. I Will Follow

6. Get On Your Boots

7. I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For

8. Stand By Me (with Somali native K’naan)

9. Stuck In A Moment (And You Can’t Get Out Of It)

10. Beautiful Day

11. Elevation

12. Pride (In The Name Of Love)

13. Miss Sarajevo

14. Zooropa

15. City Of Blinding Lights

16. Vertigo

17. Crazy Tonight Remix

18. Sunday Bloody Sunday

19. Scarlet

20. Walk On

21. One

22. Where The Streets Have No Name (Hallelujah intro)

-Encore-

23. Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me

24. With Or Without You

25. Moment Of Surrender

 

Review and Photos by kramwest1.

Special thanks to Tim Newell for his valiant video efforts.

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